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Exploring Wisconsin’s Lowest Paying Jobs: Insights and Opportunities

Wisconsin, like every state in the US, has its own job market. Its often important for job seekers to have an understanding of the workforce and economy of the area they plan to live and work in.

Fortunately, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) provides valuable data regarding many aspects of the job market in Wisconsin.

Lowest Paying Jobs in Wisconsin

The BLS data shows that gaming dealers are the lowest paid workers in Wisconsin, with an annual median wage of $17,630. This is based on the 2019 Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey.

Its important to note that this wage does not account for tips or any additional compensation. Other jobs on the list of the lowest-paid jobs in Wisconsin include food preparation and service workers, manicurists and pedicurists, and childcare workers.

Gaming dealers, specifically, are responsible for operating table games like blackjack, poker, and roulette. They handle bets, deal cards, and facilitate payouts.

At the lower end, workers in this role may earn minimum wage, while others may earn more depending on their location and experience level. In Wisconsin, those in the lowest percentile earned less than $16,970 per year, while those in the highest percentile earned over $32,060 per year.

Data Set Analysis

The BLS data set provides information on over 600 job classifications in Wisconsin. This data includes job duties, employment rates, and salaries, among other things.

The data is updated annually, making it a valuable resource for job seekers and researchers. In the 2018 data set, the median annual wage for all jobs in Wisconsin was around $44,000.

Some careers in Wisconsin, such as dentist, psychiatrist, and optometrist, had a median annual wage of over $200,000. On the other end of the spectrum, there were jobs where the median annual wage was under $20,000, such as amusement and recreation attendants, farmworkers, and fast food workers.

While job seekers can use this data to research potential careers and their earning potential, its worth noting that these salaries may vary depending on location, experience, and other factors. For example, a fast food worker in a rural area may earn less than a fast food worker in a more urban location.

Conclusion

Understanding the job market in Wisconsin can help job seekers make informed decisions about their future career paths. Whether someone is looking for a high-paying job or a job that requires minimal experience, the BLS data set provides valuable information.

While some jobs have a higher median wage than others, its important to consider other factors such as cost of living and job availability in a particular area. By researching potential careers and salaries, job seekers can better prepare themselves for the Wisconsin job market.

Lowest Paying Jobs in Wisconsin Detailed List

In this section, well take a closer look at the 100 lowest paying jobs in Wisconsin. These are based on the 2019 Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

The list ranks these jobs based on their median annual wage, with the lowest paid occupation ranked first. Rank | Job Title | Average Salary | Entry Level Salary | Number of People

—|—|—|—|—

1 | Gaming Dealers | $17,630 | $16,970 | 600

2 | Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food | $18,680 | $16,430 | 54,450

3 | Manicurists and Pedicurists | $19,110 | $16,780 | 780

4 | Childcare Workers | $19,580 | $16,620 | 12,100

5 | Counter Attendants, Cafeteria, Food Concession, and Coffee Shop | $19,640 | $16,420 | 8,190

6 | Food Preparation Workers | $19,690 | $16,460 | 5,790

7 | Dishwashers | $19,740 | $16,550 | 4,590

8 | Personal Care Aides | $20,000 | $17,060 | 18,990

9 | Ushers, Lobby Attendants, and Ticket Takers | $20,030 | $16,850 | 500

10 | Fast Food and Counter Workers | $20,080 | $16,460 | 9,190

11 | Food Servers, Non-Restaurants | $20,180 | $16,450 | 1,150

12 | Graders and Sorters, Agricultural Products | $20,490 | $16,450 | 2,000

13 | Home Health Aides | $21,140 | $17,040 | 22,590

14 | Hosts and Hostesses, Restaurant, Lounge, and Coffee Shop | $21,190 | $16,880 | 7,570

15 | Cooks, Institution and Cafeteria | $21,280 | $16,520 | 5,280

16 | Retail Salespersons | $21,690 | $16,420 | 61,280

17 | Dishwashers, Hand | $21,870 | $16,610 | 460

18 | Cashiers | $21,980 | $16,620 | 68,230

19 | Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand | $22,250 | $16,770 | 28,020

20 | Hotel, Motel, and Resort Desk Clerks | $22,410 | $16,710 | 2,250

21 | Team Assemblers | $22,430 | $16,500 | 8,060

22 | Pressers, Textile, Garment, and Related Materials | $22,680 | $16,860 | 220

23 | Home Health and Personal Care Aides | $22,900 | $17,290 | 22,950

24 | Packers and Packagers, Hand | $23,010 | $16,530 | 4,820

25 | Cooks, Fast Food | $23,050 | $16,470 | 7,150

26 | Cashiers, Convenience Stores | $23,070 | $16,860 | 1,670

27 | Receptionists and Information Clerks | $23,430 | $17,120 | 12,940

28 | Nonfarm Animal Caretakers | $23,530 | $16,650 | 820

29 | Food Preparation and Serving Related Workers, All Other | $23,560 | $16,840 | 780

30 | Medical Assistants | $23,660 | $18,050 | 10,500

31 | Bakers, Manufacturing | $23,830 | $16,820 | 400

32 | Cleaners of Vehicles and Equipment | $23,960 | $16,540 | 1,690

33 | Food and Beverage Serving Workers, All Other | $24,080 | $17,060 | 170

34 | Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners | $24,120 | $16,720 | 6,680

35 | Laundry and Dry-Cleaning Workers | $24,340 | $16,940 | 1,810

36 | Pharmacy Technicians | $24,440 | $19,020 | 7,000

37 | Packers and Packagers, Except Machine Operators and Laborers | $24,550 | $16,740 | 2,750

38 | Personal Care and Service Workers, All Other | $24,560 | $17,190 | 350

39 | Stock Clerks and Order Fillers | $24,660 | $16,670 | 26,240

40 | Security Guards | $24,800 | $19,490 | 16,680

41 | Tax Preparers | $25,070 | $17,640 | 600

42 | Graders and Sorters, Agricultural Products | $25,170 | $16,920 | 3,470

43 | Bartenders | $25,200 | $17,090 | 6,710

44 | Pest Control Workers | $25,290 | $17,480 | 560

45 | Motor Vehicle Operators, All Other | $25,330 | $16,500 | 340

46 | Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners | $25,330 | $16,630 | 16,120

47 | Dishwashers, Machine | $25,420 | $16,720 | 2,280

48 | Stockers and Material Movers, Hand | $25,630 | $17,000 | 21,850

49 | Cooks, Short Order | $25,700 | $16,430 | 1,160

50 | Couriers and Messengers | $25,840 | $20,170 | 1,630

51 | Delivery Drivers, Except Postal Service | $25,980 | $18,510 | 7,430

52 | Prepress Technicians and Workers | $26,080 | $19,920 | 100

53 | Sales and Related Workers, All Other | $26,160 | $16,440 | 2,130

54 | Gas Station Attendants | $26,260 | $17,500 | 1,650

55 | Tellers | $26,350 | $18,580 | 5,260

56 | Machine Feeders and Offbearers | $26,360 | $16,450 | 1,610

57 | Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping | $26,380 | $18,690 | 2,990

58 | Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Forklift Operators | $26,390 | $18,040 | 5,570

59 | Customer Service Representatives | $26,540 | $18,530 | 20,720

60 | Gaming and Sports Book Writers and Runners | $26,550 | $16,740 | 50

61 | Orderlies | $26,580 | $22,540 | 720

62 | Hotel, Motel, and Resort Desk Clerks | $26,630 | $16,710 | 1,210

63 | Packers and Packagers, Hand | $26,780 | $18,320 | 570

64 | Retail Salespersons, Clothing and Accessories | $26,810 | $16,680 | 1,240

65 | Excavating and Loading Machine and Dragline Operators | $26,920 | $16,660 | 280

66 | Logging Equipment Operators | $26,990 | ** | 30

67 | Tool Grinders, Filers, and Sharpeners | $27,030 | $16,690 | 30

68 | Security and Fire Alarm Systems Installers | $27,140 | $19,020 | 540

69 | Slaughterers and Meat Packers | $27,310 | $16,990 | 1,020

70 | Print Binding and Finishing Workers | $27,400 | $18,480 | 130

71 | Police, Fire, and Ambulance Dispatchers | $27,590 | $19,330 | 590

72 | Photo Lab Technicians | $27,700 | $20,650 | 70

73 | Cooks, Institution and Cafeteria | $27,840 | $16,520| 1,920

74 | Highway Maintenance Workers | $28,170 | $20,760 | 2,720

75 | Cooks, Restaurant | $28,200 | $19,800 | 12,500

76 | Recycling and Reclamation Workers | $28,330 | $20,690 | 570

77 | Postal Service Mail Sorters, Processors, and Processing Machine Operators | $28,340 | $17,840 | 1,890

78 | Machinists | $28,640 | $20,150 | 3,550

79 | Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents | $28,780 | $18,940 | 670

80 | Welding, Soldering, and Brazing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders | $28,790 | $19,400 | 2,440

81 | Bus Drivers, School or Special Client | $28,820 | $16,530 | 4,530

82 | Painting, Coating, and Decorating Workers | $28,890 | $19,700 | 1,870

83 | Structural Metal Fabricators and Fitters | $28,970 | $20,650 | 1,070

84 | Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers | $29,080 | $20,070 | 3,370

85 | Furniture Finishers | $29,090 | $20,170 | 60

86 | Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive | $29,190 | $19,480 | 17,250

87 | Construction Laborers | $29,210 | $20,540 | 6,870

88 | Light Truck or Delivery Services Drivers| $29,270 | $22,000 | 3,790

89 | Construction and Related Workers, All Other | $29,380 | $20,940 | 590

90 | Printing Press Operators | $29,530 | $21,280 | 1,000

91 | Skincare Specialists | $29,710 | $19,300 | 920

92 | Transit and Intercity Bus Drivers | $29,810 | $22,650 | 2,800

93 | Boilermakers | $29,900 | $21,900 | 40

94 | Pipelayers, Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters | $29,960 | $22,140 | 6,360

95 | Roofers | $30,030 | $20,010 | 900

96 | Welding, Brazing, and Soldering Machine Operators and Tenders| $30,240 | $22,210 | 970

97 | Electro-Mechanical Technicians | $30,350 | $21,840 | 360

98 | Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers | $30,480 | $20,780 | 7,870

99 | Tree Trimmers and Pruners | $31,150 | $22,130 | 590

100 | Computer-Controlled Machine Tool Operators, Metal and Plastic | $31,330 | $21,500 | 830

The list includes 100 different jobs in various industries such as hospitality, food service, retail, healthcare, and manufacturing.

Many of these are entry-level or low-skilled jobs that require minimal education and training.

Related Articles

For those interested in learning more about the job scene in Wisconsin, there are many resources available. The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC) provides information about job training programs and resources for job seekers.

The Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development (DWD) offers job search assistance, unemployment benefits, and other services for job seekers and businesses. For those interested in specific industries, the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection (DATCP) provides information on careers in agriculture, while the Wisconsin Manufacturers & Commerce (WMC) offers resources for those interested in manufacturing jobs.

In summary, understanding the lowest paying jobs in Wisconsin can be helpful for job seekers who are considering their career options. The list provides valuable information about the jobs that pay the least in Wisconsin.

Additionally, the related articles present several resources that offer guidance and support in finding a job or advancing in a specific industry.

Author Information

As the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of this publication, I am committed to providing valuable and informative content to our readers. With a passion for education and a keen interest in the job market, I strive to deliver articles that help readers make informed decisions about their careers.

Lowest Paying Jobs in Wisconsin Detailed List

Now that we have covered the 100 lowest paying jobs in Wisconsin, let’s delve deeper into some of the industries represented on this list. It’s important to note that the average salary and entry-level salary provided in the table are based on median wage estimates, which means that half of the workers in these occupations earn more, while the other half earn less.

Hospitality and Food Service Industry

The hospitality and food service industry accounts for a significant number of low-paying jobs in Wisconsin. Occupations like gaming dealers, combined food preparation and serving workers, manicurists and pedicurists, and counter attendants are commonly found within this sector.

These positions often have lower salaries due to factors such as minimal educational requirements and the reliance on tips for income. While working in the hospitality and food service industry may not provide the highest wages, it can still be a viable option for individuals seeking entry-level employment or part-time work.

Many people utilize these roles as stepping stones to gain experience and develop essential skills before advancing into higher-paying positions.

Retail Industry

The retail industry also features prominently on the list of lowest paying jobs in Wisconsin. Retail salespersons, cashiers, stock clerks, and customer service representatives are examples of occupations in this sector that have lower median annual wages.

These roles typically require limited formal education and offer opportunities for individuals with varying levels of experience. While the retail industry may not offer the highest salaries, it does provide valuable entry-level opportunities for individuals to gain customer service skills and work experience.

Furthermore, there may be potential for career advancement within the retail sector, with opportunities for management positions becoming available to those who demonstrate dedication and a strong work ethic.

Healthcare and Social Assistance Industry

Surprisingly, some jobs in the healthcare and social assistance industry appear on the list of lowest paying jobs in Wisconsin. Personal care aides, home health aides, and medical assistants are among the occupations in this sector with lower median wages.

These positions often involve providing direct care to patients and may require certification or training. It is important to note that while these positions may not offer high wages, they play a critical role in the healthcare system and contribute to the well-being of individuals in need.

Additionally, there can be opportunities for career advancement within the healthcare and social assistance industry, with further education and experience leading to higher paying positions.

Other Industries

The list of lowest paying jobs in Wisconsin also encompasses a range of other industries, including manufacturing, transportation, and construction. Occupations like machine feeders and offbearers, construction laborers, and bus drivers can be found within these sectors.

While these jobs may have lower median wages, they provide essential services and contribute to the overall functioning of society. Many of these roles also offer opportunities for advancement, with further training and experience leading to higher-paying positions within the respective industries.

Related Articles

For those seeking a comprehensive understanding of the Wisconsin job scene, there are several related articles and resources available. These sources provide further insights into the job market, industry trends, and opportunities for career growth.

The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC) is an excellent resource for job seekers. They provide information on training programs, financial assistance, and various resources to support individuals in their job search.

The WEDC can help individuals identify potential industries that align with their skills and interests. The Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development (DWD) is another valuable resource for both job seekers and employers.

They offer a range of services, including job search assistance, unemployment benefits, and apprenticeship programs. The DWD also provides resources to help individuals explore different careers and obtain the necessary skills for specific occupations.

For individuals interested in specific industries, there are industry-specific organizations and associations that can provide further guidance. The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection (DATCP) offers resources for those interested in agricultural careers, including information on farming, food production, and rural economic development.

The Wisconsin Manufacturers & Commerce (WMC) is another valuable resource for individuals interested in manufacturing jobs, offering information on industry trends, training programs, and networking opportunities. In conclusion, as the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of this publication, my goal is to provide readers with informative and valuable content that helps them navigate the Wisconsin job market.

By understanding the lowest paying jobs in various industries, individuals can make informed decisions about their career paths. Additionally, the related articles and resources mentioned above offer further assistance to those seeking to explore their professional options in Wisconsin.

In conclusion, understanding the lowest paying jobs in Wisconsin provides valuable insight into the state’s job market. The detailed list we explored showcased a range of industries, including hospitality, retail, healthcare, and more.

While these jobs may offer lower wages, they often serve as stepping stones for career development and provide entry-level opportunities. By utilizing the related articles and resources available, individuals can gain a comprehensive understanding of the Wisconsin job scene and make informed decisions about their career paths.

Remember, even in low-paying jobs, there is potential for growth and advancement.

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